History of the Theatre

The Lompoc Theatre is legendary for its place in stage, music and movie history. From vaudeville to ballet, symphonies to rock concerts, from Hollywood classics to independent film, the Lompoc Theater has hosted it all.

Frances Flores Goyer of Lompoc works in the ticket office of the original Lompoc Theater during the 1950s. Photo credit: Lompoc Valley Historical Society.

Frances Flores Goyer of Lompoc works in the ticket office of the original Lompoc Theater during the 1950s. Photo credit: Lompoc Valley Historical Society.

From opening night in May 1927 well into the 1970s, the theatre was Lompoc’s primary venue for entertainment, culture and civic events. And it has always been for the community. During opening week, proprietor Walter Calvert sent an open letter to the local papers:

To the fathers, mothers, and children of this prosperous and enterprising community… to the masses and the classes, the new Lompoc theatre is respectfully dedicated. As an integral part of this community, the new Lompoc Theatre is hereby pledged as a public institution, where daily worries, work, and cares may be obliterated through the medium of the universal language — motion pictures. People of the Lompoc valley, this theatre is YOURS.

It was the dream Water Calvert promised, providing a venue for local civic theatre and orchestra groups as well as world-class acts ranging from jazzman Sonny Clay to cowboy crooners Sons of the Pioneers, from classical pianist Van Cliburn to Tex-Max superstar Freddy Fender and R&B legends the Coasters. Even Liberace played the Lompoc Theatre!

The theatre was the heart of Lompoc culture and entertainment for many years. It offered much more than films - concerts, plays, lectures, Mickey Mouse Club sessions, and even "dog contests" all took place on its wooden stage.

The Lompoc Theatre survived both the Depression and the turbulence of the 1960s, but midway through the 1970s, attendance fell to a level too low to be economically sound and the Calvert family closed the theatre in 1975.

Rex Allen Live at the Lompoc Theatre

Rex Allen Live at the Lompoc Theatre

The once-elegant 450-seat theatre has been largely unused since the mid-1970s. The last year a film was projected onto its CinemaScope screen was 1985.

A shot in 2017 of the theatre before it was gutted and cleaned and chairs restored.

A shot in 2017 of the theatre before it was gutted and cleaned and chairs restored.

In the mid-2000s, the Calvert family, after declining multiple offers that would have demolished the theatre, sold the property to a redevelopment nonprofit, the Lompoc Community Housing and Development Corporation (LHCDC). LHCDC’s plans to develop the property as the Calvert Center for the Performing Arts stalled and were eventually abandoned, leaving the Calvert’s greatest wish, to leave the theatre to the community, unfulfilled.

The Lompoc Theatre went untouched for nearly a decade, the Lompoc Theatre Project Organization came together in 2012 and campaigned for the theatre against community doubt and pessimism to gain the keys to the building in 2016.

By November 2017, the Lompoc Theatre Project had paid back-taxes against the building, cleaned and gutted the inside of the theatre, fixed its drooping marquee, received large donations from famous actors, and is now on its way to begin work on restoration and construction to turn the Lompoc Theatre back to its glory days.